Transforming Lives

Every day, all over the world, USAID brings peace to those who endure violence, health to those who struggle with sickness, and prosperity to those who live in poverty. It is these individuals — these uncounted thousands of lives — that are the true measure of USAID’s successes and the true face of USAID's programs.

One of these scientists is Dyah Marganingrum, a water management expert. In her native Indonesia, the urban poor are particularly at risk for not having enough clean water. According to Indonesia’s Ministry of National Development Planning, nearly 70 percent of urban households do not have access to a piped water supply and 30 percent do not have access to the most basic sanitation.

Oleksiy Shostak, the mayor of Malyn, a city located in north central Ukraine, smiled with satisfaction as he watched a group of third graders leaving Malyn School #1. This past winter, three schools in the city switched from natural gas to biofuel heating. 

Nahid Alefi saw a business opportunity in the increasing numbers of Afghan women working outside the family home. They needed help with the housework, she reasoned, and set up the Shahre Safa Cleaning Services Co. in Kabul.

Over the past six years, USAID has contributed to the development of a “soft border” between the two areas, enabling Sudanese nomadic tribes to access traditional grazing lands in South Sudan each year. Sudanese traders are also able to travel into South Sudan, expanding access to goods.

Western Cote d’Ivoire cities are still deeply divided along political and ethnic lines following violent 2010 elections. Facilitating peace and reconciliation is a daunting task for Ivoirian authorities and civil society, but it is crucial to ensure nonviolent and inclusive presidential elections in 2015.

Where do you start when you’ve lost everything you own? What should you replace first—and how?

For the last decade, Kazakhstani farmers have suffered from the adverse effect of climate change. Impacts include variable rain patterns and early spring droughts.

Nasima’s* life changed after she learned how to sew for a living. The vocational training meant that she could stay home and work, while keeping an eye on her sick husband as well. And her daughter could return to school. Until then, Nasima had to keep the child home while she went out to work as a cleaner.

Afghanistan’s centuries-old carpet industry is looking ahead to a good year for exports with seven carpetmakers signing deals worth millions with buyers from the United States, Turkey and Europe.


Last updated: July 08, 2015