Fact Sheets

To address education issues facing the country, the Government of Haiti has made free and universal education a priority. During the fall of 2011, the Government of Haiti’s Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training (MENFP) began the rollout of an operational plan to enroll 1.5 million students in school by 2016, and to improve curricula, train teachers, and set standards for schools.

The Cap Haïtien Port is one of Haiti’s two international seaports, second to Port-au-Prince, and one of nine primary port facilities in Haiti. Located in the Bay of Cap Haïtien, the port sits on Haiti’s northern coast. It provides direct access to the markets in the northern departments of the country, which are largely geographically separated from the capital city and its port facilities by mountain ranges.

The USAID Energy Sector Capacity Building (ESCB) Activity works with energy sector partners to cultivate effective policies and build sustainable institutional capacity to increase the adoption of energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE & RE) technologies and practices. Additionally, USAID ESCB places a high priority on addressing gender issues in the energy sector, including the promotion of women in energy-related careers.

The vast majority of Nigeriens rely on subsistence agriculture and the region’s frequent droughts lead to poor harvests and regular food shortages. Chronic food insecurity and infectious disease have resulted in some of the highest rates of malnutrition and mortality in the world. As of January 2015, United Nations estimates placed Niger’s food-insecure population at nearly 3.4 million people.

Niger experiences low and variable rainfalls, land degradation, deforestation and desertification. The vast majority of Nigerians depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and frequent droughts in the region often damage crop yields, leading to food shortages in the country. Chronic food insecurity and a high prevalence of infectious diseases have led Niger to record some of the highest malnutrition and mortality rates in the world. According to United Nations estimates, nearly 3.4 million Nigeriens are chronically food insecure. 

Following Niger’s return to democratic rule in 2010, the Government of Niger committed to fighting corruption, increasing transparency, and ensuring that proper management of the country’s natural resources benefits all Nigeriens. Niger’s National Assembly plays a key role in advancing reforms needed to strengthen governance and consolidate recent democratic gains vital to furthering the country’s development. The potential revenue from extractive industries in Niger is of great importance to the economic growth of the country, and as a result, the efficient and transparent management of these industries plays a key role in Niger’s future.

Niger consistently ranks at or near the bottom of the United Nations Development Program’s Human Development Index. Chronic food insecurity and infectious disease have resulted in some of the highest rates of malnutrition and mortality in the world. Over forty percent of children under five are chronically malnourished and the rates of acute malnutrition are well beyond the threshold for public health emergencies. In addition, Niger has the highest fertility rate in the world. Left unchecked, Niger’s rapid population growth will further undermine health service delivery and weaken the resilience of the most vulnerable populations.

Niger’s population is 70% illiterate and only 44% of female primary school students reach 6th grade. To address this gap in education, the Government of Niger is implementing an ambitious national education program to increase educational access, quality and retention. USAID is contributing to these objectives together with support of the Millennium Challenge Corporation with programming that fosters a reading culture and early grade reading in local languages; an improved school environment, especially for girls; increased parental engagement; and strengthened community linkages with education administration. Additional support for impact evaluation of these activities aims to help the Ministry of Education make data-based policy and program decisions.

The five-year, $36 million USAID Building Economic Sustainability through Tourism Project (BEST) seeks to enable Jordan's transformation into a globally competitive tourism destination.

This program aims to strengthen the development of more democratic and open political processes in Jordan. More specifically, it aspires to support the participation of candidates, activists, monitors, and voters in Jordan’s municipal and parliamentary elections.

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Last updated: January 04, 2016